Frequently Asked Questions

CGC

Pet Sitting FAQ

Our “homebase” is Oregon, Wisconsin and all of our rates are listed on the website with clients from here in mind. We may accept new clients in surrounding areas, such as Stoughton, McFarland, Brooklyn, Madison, and Belleville, but a travel fee of $0.50 per mile to the destination will be applied per visit.

Yes! We are bonded and insured through Pet Sitters Associates, LLC.

You bet! Paws & Effect is owned and operated by a veterinary technician with 8+ years in the veterinary medical field. This allows us to care for pets with special needs, administer medications and subcutaneous fluids, as well as pick up on early signs of illness and treat minor injuries.

Yes, we are able to administer oral, topical, otic, optic, and injectable medications. We can also administer subcutaneous fluids. All medications must be prescribed by your veterinarian for the pet they are being administered to.

Primarily dogs and cats but we are comfortable caring for all kinds of animals! We have experience with pocket pets, birds, fish, and farm animals as well.

Due to time constraints with the growth of our business and needing to spend time with our own pets, we no longer offer overnight pet sitting to new clients.

We are currently unable to take animals into our home for pet care. Many pets are most comfortable in their own home and pet sitting visits allow them to stay there.

Almost all pets are most comfortable staying in their home while you are away, but there are some that may not be suited to long periods of time alone between visits. Dogs with severe separation anxiety are one example.

We require at least two visits per day for dogs, but most will do best with at least three if they do not have access to a place to relieve themselves between visits. Cats we require at least one visit per day. For safety reasons, we are unable to accept jobs with less frequent visits.

We pride ourselves in the fact that we have never lost a key before, but we all know that accidents happen and would like to prepare for the worst case scenario. If a key were to be misplaced or broken, without a backup we would be left with no way to access your home to care for your pets.

Our working hours are 6 AM – 9 PM. Our “office hours” are 10 AM – 5 PM — please avoid calling or texting outside of our office hours unless it is an emergency. Email or the Time to Pet portal are our best non-emergency methods of contact.

It is required by law for dogs and cats to be rabies vaccinated in the state of Wisconsin. This is to protect both your pet and you. If an unvaccinated animal were to bite someone, they are required to undergo a rabies quarantine. All animals have the potential to bite if they become scared or feel threatened. We are unable to care for pets that are not rabies vaccinated UNLESS they are pardoned by a veterinarian due to illness.

Yes, but Paws & Effect is not liable for a pet that is not confined to your residence.

Yes, but Paws & Effect is not liable for a pet that is not confined to your residence.

In most cases, we will use the equipment you provide for walking your dog. Your pet’s collar should be snugly fit so they can not slip it off over their head, but not too tight. If your pet is not trained to walk politely on leash we will require you to provide a front-clip no-pull harness or pay for walk-and-train visits, rather than our normal dog walk rate, so we can work with your pet on leash manners. We will not use prong or choke collars to walk your pet.

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Dog Training & Animal Behavior FAQ

We use positive reinforcement based training with the use of clickers or marker words. Our goal is to make training fun and strengthen the bond between you and your pet by focusing on teaching the behavior you DO want, rather than punishing the behavior you don’t want.

Primarily dogs and cats. If you are looking for training and behavior help with another species, please contact us with more information and we will let you know if we can help you out!

Our “homebase” is Oregon, Wisconsin and all of our rates are listed on the website with clients from here in mind. We also accept new clients in surrounding areas, such as Stoughton, McFarland, Brooklyn, Madison, and Belleville, but a travel fee of $0.50 per mile to the destination will be applied per session. We teach group classes in Oregon and Stoughton.

Yes! We are bonded and insured through Pet Sitters Associates, LLC, who, despite the name, also covers us for our training clients.

We use a lot of treats in group classes and private sessions simply because the dogs are learning new skills, we need to keep their attention in a very distracting environment, and we are asking them to pay attention for extended periods of time. 45-60 minutes is a long time to expect your dog to pay attention to you! Normally, when you are working with your dog at home, I would recommend working for five minute chunks of time one to three times a day, which is considerably less treats for the day. You can also scale back the amount of food you give your dog at meal times to make up for the extra calories.

Yes! Sometimes if a dog is very food motivated you can use their kibble as their training treats. If that isn’t high value enough, find out what kind of protein is in the food you are feeding. If it is chicken you can boil chicken and cut it into small pieces, if it is beef you can boil ground hamburger. Sometimes the protein is something more exotic and we need to get creative. Most prescription or limited ingredient foods have a line of treats as well.

If you are having trouble coming up with high-value treats, ask me, and I’ll help you brainstorm ideas! While we default to treats as our positive reinforcement in class, some dogs work better for toys such as tennis balls or tug toys — if you suspect this is the case with your dog we can explore rewarding them with the toy instead.

We advise to keep treats in your training toolbox for the duration of your dog’s life! This doesn’t mean you will have to give treats for every sit, down, or come, but remember, just like you don’t work for free, you shouldn’t expect your dog to either. In both group and private training we talk about weaning off treats to use a “lottery” reward system rather than giving a treat for every behavior performed. We also talk about using life rewards, play, and other methods of reinforcement. The value of the reinforcement should correlate with the difficulty of the task being performed.

Our training methods use positive reinforcement to train your pet to do what we want them to do rather than focusing on punishing the behaviors we don’t want to see. These “training collars” suppress behavior rather than teaching the pet anything, so they will likely only continue to behave they way you want when the collar is on. We also want to focus on building up your relationship with your pet. These collars cause pain and/or discomfort that can be associated with the handler and damage your bond with your pet.